Day 2

Roscoff to Morlaix

An early start in drizzle was a bit disappointing. After a good night’s sleep on the ferry I was raring to go but getting lost using the sat nav within view of the ferry was not an auspicious start. Things soon picked up when I found my first Velodyssey sign though and it felt like I was properly on my way

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I was accompanied for some of the way by Jeff and Ally, who I met on the ferry, and who are past masters at cycle touring. They were able to “hold my hand” for the first few miles which was a comfort. The cycling was not too difficult and the views over the Bay of Morlaix were great. A coffee stop at a specialist onion and asparagus restaurant and cafe perked up my morning and by early afternoon I was in Morlaix. I later found out that Roscoff is the home of Onion Johnny’s. They plied their trade right up till the 50’s by bringing onions across to the UK from this area and riding around with them wrapped around their necks and bikes. I am not convinced this would be accepted as an economically viable model these days!

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It is a bustling town with a huge viaduct used by trains. The sun shone for a while and a street band played outside the cafe where I ate a late lunch.

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 A fantastic street market and lots to look at passed the time till I met my Warmshowers hosts for the night: Vincent and Francoise. They couldn’t have been more helpful and gracious in the face of my dreadful French. They are accomplished and well travelled cyclists and have done the route I am following. A shower, a fine supper  and lots of helpful advice set me up for tomorrow: Carhaix or bust!

Francoise rang forward to book lodgings for me for tomorrow night so I now have a target of about 55 kms to achieve.

The weather forecast isn’t great for the next couple of days so I may be dodging the showers or, if it pours, stay put till it stops.

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1 Response to Day 2

  1. Raye says:

    I remember the Johnny onion men well as a child in Wales. They were able to converse with Welfsh speaking people as their languages were so similar. They were Shonni onion men there!

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